HomepagePlan of Kyiv in 1930s
The Church Of St. Basil Or Three Hierarchs
(Vasylivska Or Trokhsvyatytelska)

The Monastery Of St. Michael Of The Golden Domes

 

Built in 1183, rebuilt in the 1690s and 17003, demolished in 1935.

Located in the southwestern end of the Great Court of the Kievan rulers, the Church of St. Basil (1183) was built on the edge of the medieval city, near its defensive walls, and functioned as a Palatine church of the Great Court. One of the last Byzantine style churches built in medieval Kiev, it was a relatively small, single domed, three nave structure that had a simple and austere appearance with Romanesque details typical of the second half of the twelfth century. It survived the onslaught of the Mongol invasion of the thirteenth century, but in the years following, the church fell into disuse. Metropolitan Petro Mohyla assigned the church, previously used by Uniates, to the Bratskyi Monastery. Subsequently, the church was renovated and rededicated to Sts. Basil the Great, Gregory of Nazianus, and John Chrisostom (thus the name Three Hierarchs).
Unfortunately during the Ukrainian-Russian battles of 1658-1660 the church building was heavily damaged by artillery fire. Repairs were started by Metropolitan Varlaam Yasinskyi in the 1690s, and General Judge Vasyl Kochubei completed St. Basil's reconstruction in 1707. At that time two of its original four internal piers were removed and a new hexagonal narthex with Baroque pediment was added. The Baroque cupola of the rebuilt structure, elegantly outlined against the skyline, was seen throughout the Lowertown. Half a century later, the Zaporozhian Host funded construction of a low chapel on the southern side of the church and of a new Rococo style iconostasis in the interior of St. Basil. The new altar screen of gilded wood carving effectively highlighted on cherry-red background was considered as one of the best Kievan Rococo works.
The Church of St. Basil was dismantled, probably sometime in the summer of 1935, in preparation for the forthcoming development of the Capital Center. According to Soviet Ukraine's legislation of June 26,1926, its demolition must have been authorized by the Commissar of Education of the Ukrainian S.S.R. Prior to its demolition the Church of St. Basil was not subjected to serious archeological investigation. Adjacent to the demolished church, one of the two proposed buildings of the Capital Center was built (spring 1936-fall 1938). Designed by Leningrad architect I. G. Langbard as the Building of the Council of People's Commissars, it presently accommodates regional agencies of the Kiev Region (Oblast).Built in 1183, rebuilt in the 1690s and 17003, demolished in 1935.
Located in the southwestern end of the Great Court of the Kievan rulers, the Church of St. Basil (1183) was built on the edge of the medieval city, near its defensive walls, and functioned as a Palatine church of the Great Court. One of the last Byzantine style churches built in medieval Kiev, it was a relatively small, single domed, three nave structure that had a simple and austere appearance with Romanesque details typical of the second half of the twelfth century. It survived the onslaught of the Mongol invasion of the thirteenth century, but in the years following, the church fell into disuse. Metropolitan Petro Mohyla assigned the church, previously used by Uniates, to the Bratskyi Monastery. Subsequently, the church was renovated and rededicated to Sts. Basil the Great, Gregory of Nazianus, and John Chrisostom (thus the name Three Hierarchs).
Unfortunately during the Ukrainian-Russian battles of 1658-1660 the church building was heavily damaged by artillery fire. Repairs were started by Metropolitan Varlaam Yasinskyi in the 1690s, and General Judge Vasyl Kochubei completed St. Basil's reconstruction in 1707. At that time two of its original four internal piers were removed and a new hexagonal narthex with Baroque pediment was added. The Baroque cupola of the rebuilt structure, elegantly outlined against the skyline, was seen throughout the Lowertown. Half a century later, the Zaporozhian Host funded construction of a low chapel on the southern side of the church and of a new Rococo style iconostasis in the interior of St. Basil. The new altar screen of gilded wood carving effectively highlighted on cherry-red background was considered as one of the best Kievan Rococo works.
The Church of St. Basil was dismantled, probably sometime in the summer of 1935, in preparation for the forthcoming development of the Capital Center. According to Soviet Ukraine's legislation of June 26,1926, its demolition must have been authorized by the Commissar of Education of the Ukrainian S.S.R. Prior to its demolition the Church of St. Basil was not subjected to serious archeological investigation. Adjacent to the demolished church, one of the two proposed buildings of the Capital Center was built (spring 1936-fall 1938). Designed by Leningrad architect I. G. Langbard as the Building of the Council of People's Commissars, it presently accommodates regional agencies of the Kiev Region (Oblast).

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